CAI and Avon Breast Health Outreach Program (BHOP) Honor National Cancer Prevention Month by Saving Thousands of Lives

Program Successfully Navigates 1.2 Million Women into Screening Services, Educates Over 11 Million

(New York, NY) Every three minutes, a new diagnosis of breast cancer is made somewhere in the world. According to the World Health Organization (WHO) early detection, in the form of mammography screening, is the only method that has proved effective, improving breast cancer outcome and survival.

February is National Cancer Prevention Month and since 2000, CAI has proudly worked on the prevention front, helping to save thousands of women's lives by managing the Avon Foundation for Women's Breast Health Outreach Program (BHOP). Avon BHOP's mission is to link medically underserved women to breast health education and screening services. Low-income, under-insured, and other marginalized populations often need targeted, customized approaches to help them obtain regular mammograms and clinical breast exams.

In 2013, BHOP funded 101 community outreach and breast cancer screening programs nationwide, which target underserved populations with a low-rate of mammography and breast examinations.

"We've been privileged to manage grantmaking and provide capacity building support for Avon's BHOP," said CAI's President and Founder, Barbara Cicatelli. "Since 2000, through CAI, BHOP has awarded nearly $65 million in competitive grants to 250 community-based agencies throughout the U.S."

CAI administers a rigorous application and independent review process to select grant recipients, who in turn have made a major impact on the lives of underserved women across the United States who are in need of breast cancer screening services. Through 2013, Avon BHOP grantees had facilitated more than 1.2 million mammograms and breast examinations and educated over 11 million people on breast cancer awareness. Avon BHOP is funded by the Avon Foundation for Women.

To learn more about CAI's Avon BHOP project, click here.

Black Women with Breast Cancer 40% More Likely to Die of the Disease than White Women Says New Study

CAI's Avon Breast Health Outreach Program (BHOP) Navigates Low-Income
Women of Color into Breast Screenings to Decrease Disparity

(New York, NY) A national study published by Sinai Urban Health Institute and the Avon Foundation for Women, and presented at the Avon Foundation Breast Cancer Forum in Washington, D.C. this week, has found that, on average, the racial gap in breast cancer mortality is growing significantly wider.
The large-scale study, which is the first to examine racial disparities in breast cancer mortality in 50 cities over two decades, found that 1,710 black women — approximately five women per day — die annually on average largely due to racial disparities in screening and breast cancer treatment.
The cities found to have the largest racial disparities are Memphis, Los Angeles, Wichita, Houston, Boston, Denver, Chicago, Phoenix, Dallas and Indianapolis.
While the study found a notable decline in the white death rate between 1990 and 2009, the black mortality rate remained virtually the same, resulting in a widening disparity gap. Researchers believe four factors led to this racial disparity in breast cancer mortality for black women: less access to screening, lower screening quality, less access to treatment and poorer quality of treatment. While black women with breast cancer were found, on average, to be 40 percent more likely to die than white female breast cancer patients, some cities have even wider disparity rates. For example, a black woman with breast cancer in Los Angeles is nearly 70 percent more likely to die from the disease than a white woman.


"The results of this new study are deeply concerning and indicate that far more efforts like Avon BHOP are needed to help close the disparity gap between white and black breast cancer patients," said CAI's Avon BHOP Project Director Kathryn Gates-Ferris. "Just last year, over 16,000 black women were screened for breast cancer through BHOP-funded programs, and those with breast cancer were navigated into high-quality treatment."

Since 2000, CAI has managed Avon BHOP and helped link medically underserved women to breast health education and high-quality screening services. Low-income, under-insured and other marginalized populations often need targeted, customized approaches to help them obtain regular mammograms and clinical breast exams.

In 2013, Avon BHOP funded 101 community outreach and breast cancer screening programs nationwide, which target underserved populations with a low-rate of mammography and breast examinations.

Through 2013, Avon BHOP grantees had facilitated more than 1.2 million mammograms and breast examinations for low-income women and educated over 11 million people on breast cancer awareness. Avon BHOP is funded by the Avon Foundation for Women.
To learn more about CAI's Avon BHOP project, click here.

CAI Launches School and Community-Based Initiative to Improve the Health of the Nation’s Most Vulnerable Youth

CAI Receives New CDC Funding Award to Promote Adolescent Health Through Community and School-Based HIV/STD Prevention

(New York, NY) As the nation continues to focus on improving academic outcomes for secondary school youth, the link between health and well being and academic achievement is clear. CAI is proud to be partnering with The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health, to promote the health of our nation’s youth by initiating a groundbreaking 5-year, nationwide initiative to promote adolescent health through school and community-based HIV/STD Prevention. As one of the six National Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) awarded capacity-building assistance (CBA) grants, CAI will provide CBA to Local Education Agencies (LEAs) to enhance access to vital health care services for some of the nation's most vulnerable youth.

Through this award CAI will work with 17 LEAs across the country to enhance and strengthen partnerships and improve linkages with school and community-based health care providers. Selected LEAs serve youth and families most impacted by disparities in rates of STDs and HIV. CAI’s capacity-building services will seek to address these disparities by supporting the implementation of coordinated, and evidence-based strategies to improve the quality and responsiveness of health care services, with a focus on addressing the unique sexual and reproductive health care needs of adolescents. For information about the new initiative, visit our website: connectionsforstudentsuccess.org

CAI Helps Tackle Tobacco Use Through the 38th Annual Great American Smokeout

Statewide Quit Events Promote National Day of Action
(New York, NY) The Great American Smokeout is in its 38th year, but tobacco use is still the leading cause of preventable disease and death in New York. On this annual day of action, CAI's Tobacco Control Training Project (TCTP) is working with tobacco contractors across New York State to offer smokers the resources and support to make today their quit day.
Sponsored by the American Cancer Society, the Great American Smokeout falls on the third Thursday of November each year and hundreds of Smokeout events are planned for today across New York State.
"Quitting smoking is the single most important step anyone can take to reduce their risk of cancer," said Stan Martin, CAI's Director of Tobacco Control. The American Cancer Society estimates that 60 percent of cancers could be avoided if people stopped using tobacco.[1]
While New York State has seen a significant drop in its smoking rate, thanks to initiatives like the Clean Indoor Air Act, higher tobacco taxes, and the state's comprehensive tobacco control program, tobacco use still kills more than 25,000 New Yorkers each year. "Nearly 70 percent of current US smokers want to quit," Martin said, "and today is a great opportunity to learn about the many free quit resources and join thousands of others by going tobacco-free for 24 hours."
TCTP supported Smokeout events across New York State are designed to not only raise awareness about the devastating impact of tobacco but to also to promote cessation, decrease the social acceptability of tobacco use, and prevent initiation of tobacco use among youth and young adults.
Free personalized quit plans can be obtained by contacting the New York State Smokers' Quitline at 1-866-NY-QUITS or http://www.nysmokefree.com
[1]American Cancer Society, The Cancer Burden in New York State, July 2012

CAI and the AIDS Institute Launch Study to Learn Why 34% of New Yorkers Living With HIV/AIDS are Out of Care

An incredible 34% of New Yorkers living with HIV and AIDS are estimated to be out of medical care. In order to significantly lower that unacceptably high rate, CAI, in partnership with the AIDS Institute, is conducting a mixed-method study to learn why this population is not in care. The information gathered will be used to enhance CAI’s Leadership Training Institute’s (LTI) statewide training program, to encourage regular medical intervention for people living with HIV/AIDS (PWHA).

The study is being carried out in two phases. Phase One, recently completed, consisted of focus group discussions, held in July and August, across New York State. The focus groups offered researchers an opportunity to learn about PWHA’s challenges in accessing services and taking advantage of training opportunities. To gain an even broader perspective of PWHA’s challenges and roadblocks to medical care, CAI is today launching Phase Two, a statewide quantitative survey of PWHA. The survey can be completed online through November 1st by any PWHA living in New York State. PWHA who complete the survey will be eligible to win a valuable prize. Print copies of the survey can be obtained by calling (212) 594-7741 x278.

LTI, which is housed at CAI, was the first group initiative in New York State to lead trainings by and for PWHA. LTI has trained over 3,000 PWHA since its launch in 1999 and pairs trainees with a PWHA mentor. An evaluation of LTI graduates compiled between 2009 and 2011 found that 76% believed that their mentor’s support helped mentees cope with their HIV disease while 85% would recommend the LTI mentor program to a friend “that might need to improve his or her HIV health care.”

For more information about LTI, click here