HOPE Buffalo Initiative Launched

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Goal to Reduce Teen Pregnancy Rates by 30% by 2020

ERIE COUNTY, NY— At a kickoff event today, the HOPE Buffalo initiative was announced to the community and media. This collaborative project, involving a diverse coalition of Erie County stakeholders, has a primary goal to reduce the rate of teen pregnancy in select Erie County zip codes (14201, 14204, 14206, 14207, 14208, 14209, 142011, 14213, and 14215) by 30% by the year 2020.

In the target zip code areas, the average teen birth rate in 2012 was 61.3 per 1,000 females between the ages of 15 and 19. This is more than 3 times greater than New York State’s (excluding New York City) average of 18.5 per 1,000 and the 2013 national teen birth rate of 26.5 per 1,000 females.

HOPE Buffalo will:      

  • Advocate for the prevention of teen pregnancy, sexually transmitted infections and HIV/AIDS among Buffalo's youth
  • Promote equitable access to comprehensive sexuality education and reproductive health
  • Empower youth to make informed decisions about their health

The community coalition of organizations supporting HOPE Buffalo will:

  • Ensure that teens have access to both health education and healthcare providers
  • Respect teens’ right to make their own decisions and set their own goals  
  • Help teens achieve their goals

HOPE Buffalo is supported by a grant from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of Adolescent Health (“OAH”) to the Erie County Department of Health and CAI (Cicatelli Associates Inc.)

“I am tremendously excited about this new outreach effort to provide necessary information to Buffalo’s youth to help them make informed decisions so they can achieve their goals,” said Dr. Gale Burstein, Commissioner, Erie County Department of Health. “With involvement from our strong community partners and financial support from the Office of Adolescent Health, we believe we can make a measurable impact in the lives of these teens. We are working to ensure that our youth have access to health education and healthcare providers, which will improve their health and build a healthy future for our community.”

To learn more about HOPE Buffalo, please click here.

NEW TOOLKIT RELEASED TO BUILD THE CAPACITY OF HEALTHCARE ORGANIZATIONS TO TACKLE THEIR PATIENTS’ TOBACCO USE

Implementation of Evidence-Based Care in New York State

New York, NY – The Center of Excellence for Health Systems Improvement (COE for HSI) for a Tobacco-Free New York is pleased to announce the release of its new toolkit Supporting Evidence-Based Tobacco Dependence Screening & Treatment. This important resource fills a previous gap, and can be used by healthcare organizations to train their staff on evidence-based best practices for tobacco dependence treatment on an ongoing basis. The goal of the toolkit is to build the capacity of entire care teams to screen and treat tobacco dependence in order to minimize missed opportunities to treat tobacco users who visit their providers for other needs. More than 70 percent of tobacco users visit a healthcare provider each year, and each of these visits is an opportunity for providers to treat a patient’s tobacco use.1

This new toolkit features training resources that have been developed for all levels of healthcare staff, including frontline staff, prescribing clinicians, counseling staff, and staff with responsibilities for quality improvement. The toolkit includes three training curricula, including lesson plans, slide decks, handouts, and a video. Quality improvement tools have been designed to assist healthcare organizations to institutionalize systems for assuring all patients, regardless of the reason for their visit, are screened for tobacco dependence and provided with evidence-based treatment, if desired.

“Every staff member in the healthcare organization has an important role to play in treating their patients for tobacco dependence,” said Marcy Hager, Director of the COE for HSI. “The COE for HSI toolkit will ensure that staff members are continuously trained on evidence-based best practices for tobacco dependence and that staff members know their roles and responsibility within the healthcare organization to provide continuous life-saving tobacco dependence screening and treatment.”

The COE for HSI is working across New York State with regional contractors to engage health care organizations that serve populations disproportionately impacted by tobacco use, including: New Yorkers with low incomes; individuals with less than a high school education; and those who report having serious mental illness. The toolkit has been released to ten regional contractors across the New York State who work with healthcare organizations that serve these priority populations, including federally qualified health centers, community health centers, and other safety net providers.

For more information about the work of the COE for HSI, visit www.tobaccofreeny.org.


1 Fiore et al. Treating Tobacco Use and Dependence: 2008 Update. Rockville, MD: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, 2008.


About CAI: CAI is a global nonprofit organization dedicated to improving the health and well-being of underserved populations worldwide. For 36 years CAI has provided customized capacity building services to health and human service organizations in more than 27 countries and in all 50 states. Offering more than 1,500 training programs annually, CAI’s passionate staff works to fulfill its mission: to use the transformative power of education and research to foster a more aware, healthy, compassionate and equitable world. For more information about CAI, visit our website: www.caiglobal.org.

About the Center of Excellence for Health Systems Improvement: With funding from the New York State Department of Health, Bureau of Tobacco Control, CAI serves as the Center of Excellence for Health Systems Improvement (COE for HSI) for a Tobacco-Free New York. The COE for HSI promotes large-scale systems and policy changes to support the universal provision of evidence-based tobacco dependence treatment services. The COE for HSI aims to support 10 regional contractors throughout New York State working with health care systems and organizations that serve those populations for which tobacco use prevalence rates have not decreased in recent years - adults with low incomes, less than a high school diploma, and/or serious mental illness. Focused on providing capacity-building assistance services around topics like how to engage and obtain buy-in from leadership to implement the kinds of systems-level changes that will result in identification and intervention with every tobacco user who seeks care, the COE for HSI also will offer materials and resources to support contractors in their regional work. For more information, click here to visit the project website.

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"PLAN C" A VITAL OPTION FOR WOMEN WANTING TO REDUCE THE CHANCE OF UNINTENDED PREGNANCY

New Resource Promotes Increased Provision of Most Effective Method of Emergency Contraception

New York, NY – Nearly one in every two pregnancies is unintended, with 53% of unintended pregnancies due to non-use of a contraceptive method and 43% due to incorrect contraceptive use.1,2 In New York State, efforts are underway to support women and their partners to reduce the chance of pregnancy after unprotected sex by promoting the use of the copper intrauterine device (IUD) as emergency contraception (EC). In addition to being one of the most effective forms of contraception, the copper IUD is the most effective form of EC, with a failure rate of less than 0.1%.3

The New York State Center of Excellence for Family Planning and Reproductive Health Services, a project of CAI, has produced an implementation toolkit to support the successful implementation of the copper IUD as EC in health care settings—the first of its kind. The toolkit was developed for agencies that receive Title X Family Planning Program funding through the New York State Department of Health’s Comprehensive Family Planning and Reproductive Health Care Services Program, as well as other sexual and reproductive health care providers in New York State and beyond.

Traditionally, the term “EC” has referred mostly to Plan B or Ella. Both of these EC options, while effective, only protect against an unintended pregnancy one time following unprotected sex. In offering the copper IUD as EC for immediate and long-term use, family planning providers have an opportunity to support a woman who has experienced a contraceptive emergency while helping her to prevent future unintended pregnancy for up to 10-12 years.4  

“In New York State, we are extremely fortunate to have an infrastructure in place to provide those women who select the IUD with their contraceptive method of choice,” stated Elizabeth Jones, Director of the New York State Center of Excellence for Family Planning and Reproductive Health Services. “However, offering the copper IUD same-day as EC has operational implications for health care providers. This toolkit helps sexual and reproductive health providers to leverage and adapt their current systems and begin offering this innovative, evidence-based service.”

The toolkit includes background information about the copper IUD, the rationale for offering it to clients, and implementation tools for administrators, clinicians, and frontline staff. The toolkit is available to download by health care providers here.

 

For more information about the work of the New York State Center of Excellence for Family Planning and Reproductive Health Services, visit nysfamilyplanningcoe.org.


1. Finer LB, Zolna MR, Declines in unintended pregnancy in the United States, 2008-2011. New England Journal of Medicine, 2016; 374:843-52. 
2. Frost JJ, Darroch JE, Factors associated with contraceptive choice and inconsistent method use, US, 2004. Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health, 2008; 40(2):94-104. 
3. Intrauterine Contraception. (2015). Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/reproductivehealth/unintendedpregnancy/contraception.htm#Intrauterine-Contraception-IUD-IUS.
4. While the on-label use of the copper IUD is up to 10 years, current evidence-based, best practice supports the use of the copper IUD up to 12 years.


About CAI: CAI is a global nonprofit organization dedicated to improving the health and well-being of underserved populations worldwide. For more than 35 years CAI has provided customized capacity building services to health and human service organizations in more than 27 countries and in all 50 states. Offering more than 1,500 training programs annually, CAI’s passionate staff works to fulfill its mission: to use the transformative power of education and research to foster a more aware, healthy, compassionate and equitable world. For more information about CAI, visit our website: www.caiglobal.org

About the Center of Excellence for Family Planning and Reproductive Health Services (NYS COE): Since its establishment in 2011, the NYS COE has delivered capacity-building support to the New York State Department of Health’s (NYS DOH) Title X network of 48 sub-recipient agencies in two key areas: implementation of operational best practices to ensure sustainability in the changing health care environment; and delivery of quality family planning services through the adoption of evidence-based practices and continuous quality improvement activities. For more information about the NYS COE, visit nysfamilyplanningcoe.org

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KICK BUTTS DAY HIGHLIGHTS THE ROLE OF HEALTH CARE PROFESSIONALS IN DECREASING RATES OF YOUTH TOBACCO USE

Health Care Organizations Should Integrate Tobacco Screening and Treatment into Adolescent Standard Clinical Care to Assist the Nearly 25 Percent of All High School Seniors that Currently Use Tobacco.1

New York, NY – This Wednesday March 16th marks the 10th anniversary of Kick Butts Day — a national day of activism focused on educating youth about the dangers of tobacco use and encouraging youth to stand up to Big Tobacco. Hosted by Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, Kick Butts Day encourages youth to reject tobacco industry’s targeted youth marketing and supports proven strategies to prevent youth tobacco use, which includes: advocating for higher tobacco taxes, applying smoke-free laws, and implementing prevention and cessation programs. 

According to a 2015 publication released by the American Academy of Pediatrics, youth still are disproportionately impacted by tobacco use, with more than 3.6 million current youth tobacco users in the US.2  Of those current users, more than 80 percent will continue using tobacco as adults. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, if tobacco use among youth continues at current rates, 5.6 million of Americans currently under 18 years will die prematurely from tobacco-related illnesses.3 Youth with low socioeconomic status (SES) have a higher prevalence of tobacco use than youth with higher SES - a variance that contributes to persistent disparities in health outcomes in adulthood.4

The Center of Excellence for Health Systems Improvement for a Tobacco-Free New York (COE for HSI) encourages health care providers to screen and provide tobacco dependence treatment to all New Yorkers, including adolescents, by integrating tobacco cessation treatment into standard clinical care. The COE for HSI supports this effort by working with ten regional contractors across New York State to implement policy and systems changes in health care organizations that serve populations that use tobacco at disparate rates by integrating evidence-based best practices for tobacco dependence treatment into routine care. Health care organizations have an opportunity to help individuals, including youth, gain access to tobacco dependence treatment to decrease tobacco use rates in New York State. “We strongly encourage health care organizations to use Kick Butts Day as a day of action to make tobacco cessation among adolescents a priority,” said Marcy Hager, Project Director of COE for HSI. “This effort will ensure that another generation does not have to suffer the high consequences of tobacco use on their generation’s overall health.”

To learn more about Kick Butts Day activities across New York, visit www.kickbuttsday.org

For more information about the work of the COE for HSI, visit www.tobaccofreeny.org.


1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2015, October 14). Youth and Tobacco Use. Retrieved from www.cdc.govhttp://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/data_statistics/fact_sheets/youth_data/tobacco_use/
2.  American Academy of Pediatrics, Julius B. Richmond Center of Excellence Tobacco Consortium. (2015, April) State-of-the-Art Office-Based Interventions to Eliminate Youth Tobacco Use: The Past Decade. Pediatrics, Volume 135/Issue 4.
3. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention.
4. Tobacco Control Legal Consortium (2012). Cause and Effect: Tobacco Marketing Increases Youth Among Youth and Young Adults: A Report of the 2012 Surgeon General's Report. St. Paul, MN: Tobacco Control Legal Consortium.


About CAI: CAI is a global nonprofit organization dedicated to improving the health and well-being of underserved populations worldwide. For more than 35 years CAI has provided customized capacity building services to health and human service organizations in more than 27 countries and in all 50 states. Offering more than 1,500 training programs annually, CAI’s passionate staff works to fulfill its mission: to use the transformative power of education and research to foster a more aware, healthy, compassionate and equitable world. For more information about CAI, visit our website: www.caiglobal.org.

About the Center of Excellence for Health Systems Improvement: With funding from the New York State Department of Health, Bureau of Tobacco Control, CAI serves as the Center of Excellence for Health Systems Improvement (COE for HSI) for a Tobacco-Free New York. The COE for HSI promotes large-scale systems and policy changes to support the universal provision of evidence-based tobacco dependence treatment services. The COE for HSI aims to support 10 regional contractors throughout New York State working with health care systems and organizations that serve those populations for which tobacco use prevalence rates have not decreased in recent years - adults with low incomes, less than a high school diploma, and/or serious mental illness. Focused on providing capacity-building assistance services around topics like how to engage and obtain buy-in from leadership to implement the kinds of systems-level changes that will result in identification and intervention with every tobacco user who seeks care, the COE for HSI also will offer materials and resources to support contractors in their regional work. For more information, visit www.tobaccofreeny.org.

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NEW YORK TOBACCO CONTROL PROGRAM HEADS TO ALBANY TO HELP SAVE LIVES AND MONEY

In New York, more than 28,000 adults die annually from smoking related diseases

New York, NY – This week, more than 30 tobacco control programs from across the state will head to Albany to meet with lawmakers about the deadly impact of tobacco use on New York’s most vulnerable populations. Killing more than 28,000 New Yorkers every year, tobacco use continues to be the #1 preventable cause of death in the United States. At the annual Legislative Day on Tuesday, February 9, programs will educate legislators on the necessity of New York’s Tobacco Control Program. Among them will be CAI’s Center of Excellence for Health Systems Improvement for a Tobacco-Free New York, which will focus on the importance of promoting large-scale systems and policy changes to support the universal provision of evidence-based tobacco dependence treatment services.

Although tobacco use has declined in recent years among the general population, data indicates significant disparities in tobacco use prevalence among those New York adults with less than a high school education, low incomes, and serious mental illness—populations that continue to use tobacco at rates well above the general population. The mission of comprehensive tobacco control programs is to reduce the health disparities that tobacco use causes by establishing infrastructure and building capacity regionally, and to reduce barriers to individuals seeking treatment and promote tobacco-free environments. 

 “The COE for HSI and ten regional contractors are working to decrease the disparities in tobacco use prevalence by promoting the integration of evidence-based tobacco dependence screening and treatment into routine care within medical and behavioral health care organizations,” said Marcy Hager, Project Director of the Center of Excellence for Health System Improvement. “Although there has been significant progress in decreasing tobacco rates in the general population, work to ensure that disparate populations have access to tobacco dependence treatment and resources is essential in continuing to see overall declines in tobacco prevalence in New York.”

 Led by Hager, the New York State Department of Health Bureau of Tobacco Control-funded program will participate in the day’s activities by meeting with elected officials to explain the importance of supporting health systems improvements related to tobacco dependence treatment within health care organizations. Such improvements will ensure that every patient is screened for tobacco use, and all tobacco users are offered evidence-based tobacco dependence treatment on a regular basis. New York State legislators are invited to visit Conference Room C of the Empire State Plaza Concourse at 2:00 p.m., where representatives of Advancing Tobacco-Free Communities (Community Engagement and Reality Check) and Health Systems for a Tobacco-Free New York will be joined by volunteer youth leaders to answer questions and offer resources about effective tobacco control programs being delivered across the state. 

 For more information about the work of the COE for HSI, visit www.tobaccofreeny.org.


1. The Toll of Tobacco in New York; Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids; Updated September 25, 2015.http://www.tobaccofreekids.org/facts_issues/toll_us/new_york
2. Bureau of Tobacco Control StatShot, Vol. 8, No. 2/Feb 2015, based on New York State Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2013.
3. Best Practices for Comprehensive Tobacco Control Programs, 2014, Section A: State and Community Interventions, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/stateandcommunity/best_practices/pdfs/2014/comprehensive.pdf

 

About CAI: CAI is a global nonprofit organization dedicated to improving the health and well-being of underserved populations worldwide. For more than 35 years CAI has provided customized capacity building services to health and human service organizations in more than 27 countries and in all 50 states. Offering more than 1,500 training programs annually, CAI’s passionate staff works to fulfill its mission: to use the transformative power of education and research to foster a more aware, healthy, compassionate and equitable world. For more information about CAI, visit our website: www.caiglobal.org.

About the Center of Excellence for Health Systems Improvement: With funding from the New York State Department of Health, Bureau of Tobacco Control, CAI serves as the Center of Excellence for Health Systems Improvement (COE for HSI) for a Tobacco-Free New York. The COE for HSI promotes large-scale systems and policy changes to support the universal provision of evidence-based tobacco dependence treatment services. The COE for HSI aims to support 10 regional contractors throughout New York State working with health care systems and organizations that serve those populations for which tobacco use prevalence rates have not decreased in recent years - adults with low incomes, less than a high school diploma, and/or serious mental illness. Focused on providing capacity-building assistance services around topics like how to engage and obtain buy-in from leadership to implement the kinds of systems-level changes that will result in identification and intervention with every tobacco user who seeks care, the COE for HSI also will offer materials and resources to support contractors in their regional work. For more information, visit www.tobaccofreeny.org.

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